Beauty of Timeless Chinoiserie

We were on Timothy Corrigan and Fromental Design IG Live this morning for their talking about Tomothy’s new collection —Les Folies.

“Spring Fever Exquisite botanical illustrations by 16th century Flemish artist Joris Hoefnagel inspire the playful and decorative motif of Spring Fever. The interpretation of Hoefnagel’s drawings provide the foundation for the repeated design, which transforms the wallcovering from a delicate pattern to a powerful visual experience.” Timothy said that his Spring Fever collection has spirit of chinoiserie. We couldn’t agree with him more.

The beautiful China Porcelain vintage blue, the graceful and intricate details of hand-painted botanical blooms and butterflies are rather fascinating. The term chinoiserie, which comes from the French word chinois, or “Chinese,” denotes that chinoiserie did not, in fact, come directly from Asia but is instead a European interpretation of Asian culture and decorative arts. The style originated in the 17th century, in tandem with Europe’s flourishing trade with China and other countries of East Asia. As a style, chinoiserie is related to the Rococo style. Both styles are characterized by exuberant decoration, asymmetry, a focus on materials, and stylized nature and subject matter that focuses on leisure and pleasure.

From traditional to modern, chinoiserie goes well with every look and adds a sense of timelessness and sophistication to any space.

We love how this classical chinoiserie wallpaper nicely contrasts with modern furnishings in the house.

We love the more modern approach for Chinoisseire wallpaper design in the past several years. It feels so fresh and chic in terms of color, scale and motif applications.

The Major Motifs in chinoserie include Foo dogs, pagodas, nature scenes and dragon.

Foo Dog: These date back thousands of years to Imperial China. And despite their name, foo dogs are actually lions, made to stand guard outside palaces and temples. Foo dogs typically come in pairs—one male and one female—to represent the balance of yin and yang.

Pagodas:While an integral part of East Asian architecture, pagodas actually originated as sacred sites in India. The spread of Buddhism brought them to China, where they were assimilated into the regional style.

Nature scenes: As wallpapers became popular in European homes, the upper class turned to chinoiserie designs, many of which were handmade and often very costly. Lighthearted nature scenes were all the rage, including lush garden vignettes and sprawling floral motifs. 

Dragons: Symbolizing strength and good luck, dragons hold a prominent place in Chinese mythology and folklore. Historical emperors favored dragon motifs in clothing and interiors; today, they surface on all manner of ceramics, silk screens, and works of art.

Ready to add a touch of chinoserie chic at your home for this summer? Shop chinosserie furnishings and objects We handpicked for you(click each image for details):